[MCCN Recent News]

Make 2015 the Year of Every Creature Singing

“Final” is a strong word that probably never applies to an online resource. Nevertheless, what is posted right now on MCCN’s Every Creature Singing pages is what you are going to see for quite some time. I have edited and re-edited the original version of the curriculum and fiddled endlessly with online linking and posting issues. I would also like to thank Roberta Miller Yoder for her careful copyediting and formatting services. It is time to leave well enough alone!

Now that Every Creature Singing is this far along, I hope to spend time actually doing the practices in the curriculum instead of just recommending them to other people. (!) In the interests of making that hope a reality, I invite you to join me on a 12-month venture I’m beginning this New Year. Each month, I plan to choose something from the session with that month’s number to work on. It could be a household practice, a spiritual practice, a discussion question or an idea from the essay. January will focus on session 1, February, session 2 and so on.
 

Out of the Whirlwind: A Women's Spirituality Retreat

Friday, January 23, 7 p.m. to Saturday, January 24, 3 p.m. at
Merry Lea Environmental Learning Center of Goshen College

Step out of the whirlwind and make space to listen for God's voice. Gather together with women of all ages to rest in a beautiful winter setting, to learn from inspiring presenters, to worship and share food together. Experiment with spiritual practices inspired by seeking the presence of God in the natural world in Saturday morning workshops, and connect with wild places in the dark on a crisp night hike. Jackie Wyse-Rhodes will return to provide biblical input for this 3rd annual event.

Living Stones: An Urban Prayer Walk

MCUSA’s Andre Gingerich Stoner brought this guest post on the blog MennoNerds to our attention recently. The author, Lawrence Jennings, is a native New Yorker who attends Infinity Mennonite Church of Harlem and cares deeply about climate change. Living Stones describes a prayer walk that takes place weekly at a public housing complex in Harlem. The next time you take an early morning walk on a Thursday, know that the Harlem prayer walkers are out there with you, appreciating the rhythms of nature too.

Partners for Sacred Places

[MCCN Resource]

 

 

 

This urban organization promotes partnerships and resource sharing between congregations and their surrounding communities—particularly in the area of underutilized buildings. The website provides examples of partnerships between churches and arts organizations, community gardens and health care programs. They also provide resources to keep the collaborations happy.  Partners for Sacred Places has a well designed website that could serve as a resource for any congregation seeking creative solutions to space issues or needing tenants. Sharing space is another way to care for creation.

A Creation Care Family Story

by Lauresta Welty
Energy saving is something we talk about in our family. When I became a part of the Creation Care Small Group this past December, I realized we were not talking about it as much as we could be. Being a part of the group made me more aware of what steps I could immediately take in my own home to save energy and help my family members do the same.

In a world that is so full of failure of so many kinds, I think it is important to share and celebrate these victories, however small they may seem. This is the reason I wanted to share this story...

Becoming "Energy Saints" at Hyde Park Mennonite Fellowship

Over the past year, a small group at Hyde Park Mennonite Fellowship in Boise, Idaho, has focused on the idea of becoming “Energy Saints.” Their goal is to actively reduce energy consumption in their congregation. Biking to church and work, using LED lights, weatherizing houses for winter and working with individual households to track electricity usage are just a few examples of how these "Energy Saints" are caring for creation. Click here to check out their website for more ideas.  

The group began studying the Creation Care Network’s curriculum, “Every Creature Singing: Embracing the Good News for Planet Earth” last summer.

One member of this group, Roger Piper-Ruth, wrote an "Energy Saints" theme song, and his daughter Lauresta Welty gathered pictures from people in the congregation engaging in “Energy Saint” activities. Together with her husband Justin, Lauresta created a slide show to go along with the song. It was a hit at Hyde Park Mennonite and they are excited to share it with the wider Creation Care Network and Mennonite community. We're proud to have the Energy Saints as a 100-Shades of Green congregation.

View the "Energy Saints" YouTube video here
Song written by Roger Piper-Ruth
Video produced by Lauresta and Justin Welty
Featuring pictures from "Energy Saints" at Hyde Park Mennonite Fellowship

Reabsorbing the Rooted and Grounded Conference (Part 3)

Over 170 people participated in Rooted and Grounded: A Conference on Land and Christian Discipleship, offered at Anabaptist Biblical Mennonite Seminary September 18-20. With 56 presentations to choose from, the event was a feast for the mind and heart, with a year’s worth of ideas packed into one weekend. For those of you who missed the conference, or those who attended and couldn’t take it all in, we offer a snack-size review of some of the questions encountered there. This is part three in a series of four reflections.

Presentation: Green Disciples: Faith-Based Environmental Work in Canada
Presenter: Joanne Moyer
Question: Where do we find hope?

Reabsorbing the Rooted and Grounded Conference (Part 2)

Over 170 people participated in Rooted and Grounded: A Conference on Land and Christian Discipleship, offered at Anabaptist Biblical Mennonite Seminary September 18-20. With 56 presentations to choose from, the event was a feast for the mind and heart, with a year’s worth of ideas packed into one weekend. For those of you who missed the conference, or those who attended and couldn’t take it all in, we offer a snack-size review of some of the questions encountered there. This is part two in a series of four reflections.
 

How do we hold together human grief and ecological grief? Or can't we?